Black Bear, Blue Grosbeak

What began as a quest to photograph a black bear in the wild became a three-day adventure along a portion of the Eastern Seaboard this week. How exciting it was to see this black bear foraging in an open field, at dusk, at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in North Carolina.

Two Sanderlings displayed perfect synchronicity as they flew together before landing on a beach at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina.

The yellow of this Prothonotary Warbler seemed to glow in the filtered light of a bald cypress forest at First Landing State Park in Virginia.

Another true highlight was seeing a Blue Grosbeak for the first time. This male was with his mate at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. An incredibly beautiful bird in a truly magnificent park.

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and freedom.” – Victor Frankl

Higher Ground

Blackburnian and Magnolia warblers were two of the real highlight birds during my jaunt to Central Park this week.
The male Baltimore Oriole stops me in my tracks every time. This one was singing at Rockefeller State Park.
An American Redstart snags a worm at the Lenoir Preserve in Yonkers while even the Yellow Warblers are becoming a bit more difficult to find now that the leaves have fully grown.

“When you feel the earth moving, bring yourself back to the now. You’ll handle whatever shake-up the next moment brings when you get to it. In this moment, you’re still breathing. In this moment, you’ve survived. In this moment, you’re finding a way to step onto higher ground.” – Oprah Winfrey

On the Lookout

A Yellow Warbler at Rockefeller State Park and an Indigo Bunting at Teatown Lake Reservation in Ossining, in their lofty perches.
A Green Heron at Halsey Pond in Irvington, NY also seems to enjoy standing, perched up high, with a view.
An Orchard Oriole at Croton Point Park and a Prairie Warbler at Teatown Lake Reservation in Ossining, NY.

“What difference would it make to the quality of our lives if we lingered more in nature? We invite you to spend some time reconnecting to the wild and alive Earth and practice experiencing the sacredness of the first Incarnation.” – The Center for Action and Contemplation

Warbler Wednesday!

Palm Warbler, Halsey Pond, Irvington, New York.
Magnolia Warbler, Rockefeller State Park, Pocantico, New York
Ovenbird, Hillside Woods, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York
Chestnut-sided Warbler, Rockefeller State Park
Yellow Warbler, Rockefeller State Park

They know – it’s time
They know
In every feather they can feel it
They know

Every bird in the sky knows
A change is gonna come
By an’ by

Eric Bibb – Songwriter and musician – from his song “They Know”

Such Miracles!

Black-throated Blue Warbler at Hillside Woods in Hastings, New York this morning.
Yellow-rumped Warbler at Halsey Pond in Irvington, New York
My first sighting of a Prothonotary Warbler. Belleplain State Forest in New Jersey.
Black and white Warbler. Hillside Woods, Hastings, New York
Hooded Warbler, Belleplain State Forest, New Jersey

The Warbler Parade is officially underway! The May migration spectacle has already been everything I had hoped… and it’s only May 3rd!

“I feel poised at the edge of a great adventure. For me, these birds and their movements in waves northward, draw a veil of life, of beauty, of urgency, across this continent. It’s the most exciting time of year to me – it’s what I wait eleven months for. I will be soaking it in with every fiber of my being. Birds are such miracles!” – Melissa Groo

The Avian Parade Marches On

A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher zeroes in on an insect at Rockefeller State Park while an 8-week-old Great Horned Owl owlet catches the morning sun at Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx. Black-capped Chickadees are easy to take for granted but these feisty, little birds can enthrall us with their beautiful yet simple song.

“Gratefulness is possible with the awareness of the fragility of what we have.” – Mike Martin

The Avian Parade

The New York Times recently described spring migration as the “avian parade” and it’s a fitting way to portray the beautiful birds now marching our way.

A Great Egret, two Yellow-crowned Night herons and a Palm Warbler were recent area highlights as we head into our favorite (birding) time of year!

“A bird does not sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” – Maya Angalou

Spreading Their Wings

A Great Blue Heron flies toward a perch at Halsey Pond in Irvington, NY while two Bald Eagles fly together at Croton Point Park.
An Osprey displays its fishing skills at Marshlands Conservancy while a Killdeer spreads its wings next to the Hudson River.

“Each day is an invitation to see the world in a new way.” – Marv & Nancy Hiles

A New Season Begins

Killdeer, some of the first birds back to our area, were showing some spring-like behavior at Sherwood Island State Park in CT.
Red-winged Blackbirds have also now returned. This one was establishing his territory at Constitution Marsh in Garrison, NY.
One of our year-round residents, a Mallard drake stretches out at the start of his day on the Hudson River in Dobbs Ferry, NY.

“I photograph birds because they are visual poetry to me. I see them as the truest embodiment of grace, hope and beauty.” – Melissa Groo – Wildlife photographer and Conservationist